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Lawyers of San Diego is a specialty bar association committed to advancing the status of women in the law and society. We will be using this space to share articles written about Lawyers Club events and programs, and items of interest to our members which are relevant to our mission. The opinions outlined in content published on the Lawyers Club of San Diego blog are those of the author and not Lawyers Club. All members are encouraged to respectfully participate in discussions regarding the topics posted on the blog, and guest writers are welcome.

 

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Guest Blog: Fear of Flying or Just Say Yes?

Posted By Jodie M. Williams, Tuesday, September 12, 2017
Guest Blog: Fear of Flying or Just Say Yes?

In spring 2017, I hosted a podcast for the ABA Section of Antitrust Law entitled, “Women in Antitrust.” I interviewed three outstanding women in the field: Lisa Phelan, Antitrust Division Chief for the Washington Criminal I Section of the Department of Justice; Tianna Russell, a trial attorney working with Ms. Phelan at the Department of Justice; and Kristen Anderson, a partner at Scott + Scott in New York (her firm also has an office in San Diego). 


Antitrust is economics-driven and particularly male-dominated, more so than many other areas of law. In the podcast, my guests discussed a range of topics relevant to women, from how to position yourself better in the workplace, to weathering the administration change (or any change in management, for that matter). While focused on antitrust practice, their words of wisdom transcend the antitrust niche and apply to any area of the law. I thought it was prime for posting here, and fortunately Lawyers Club agreed. (In that vein, I thought that a title with an homage to two famous women – one a
great feminist author and the other an iconic first lady – was appropriate.)


One thing that Ms. Phelan said struck me in particular: Don’t be afraid to say yes. She explained that women often don’t say yes because we’re too afraid of failing. As a result, we count ourselves out from the get-go. As I listened to her, I found myself reflecting on several times in my own practice where I did not step up, take on more work within my cases, or participate in extra-curricular programs for fear that I might not have enough time. What if it took away from my kids? What if I took on too much? What if I failed? I was so concerned I would not succeed, that I took myself out of the running before I even got started. So, when Ms. Phelan later asked me to put together a proposal for a Women in Antitrust subcommittee for the ABA Section of Antitrust Law, I took a healthy dose of her advice. I said yes. 


Time will tell if our proposal is accepted, but I will be ready if and (hopefully) when it is. I hope the words of these women similarly inspire you. Please,
take a listen

Guest blogger Jodie M. Williams is Counsel at MoginRubin LLP, a boutique antitrust firm in San Diego and Washington, D.C.

Tags:  ABA antitrust section  antitrust  LCB  podcast  yes 

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Guest Blog - Surviving Domestic Violence: My Personal Journey

Posted By Dovie Yoana King, Wednesday, September 6, 2017
Guest Blog - Surviving Domestic Violence: My Personal Journey

 

Domestic violence is a serious, preventable, public health epidemic that affects millions of Americans each year. It can happen to anyone regardless of age, education, economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion, or national origin. Domestic violence is usually accompanied by emotionally abusive and controlling behavior that is part of a systematic pattern of dominance and control.

 

Survivors of abuse tend to suffer alone in silence, leading lives of isolation, shame, fear and secrecy. It takes incredible determination for survivors to step forward and seek help. I speak from personal experience, as I too was once a victim of domestic violence.

 

In my case, I married over a decade ago with every illusion of living a happy life. I was a young attorney at the peak of my career and thriving in my personal and professional life. I had a bright future ahead of me; however, the illusion of happiness quickly shattered. I endured domestic violence in the form of emotional, verbal, sexual, physical, and financial abuse for years. 

 

Unfortunately, like many other professional women, I did not think it could happen to me. After all, I am educated, bright, and talented. I have high self-esteem and am successful in my career as a lawyer, fighting for social justice on behalf of my clients. Thus, I did not feel I fit the stereotype of an abused woman. But behind closed doors, I was hiding a dark secret – I was being constantly berated, belittled, humiliated, and devalued by my abuser, and all of this was compounded by other forms of abuse.

 

But all was not lost. I decided to break the silence and get help to escape the abuse. I contacted a hotline for help and was put in touch with my local police department. From there, I was referred to the San Diego Family Justice Center, which is an organization that provides free and comprehensive services to victims of abuse and their children. I filed for divorce and successfully obtained both a domestic violence restraining order and the sole, legal, and physical custody of my young child. I began attending weekly support groups and therapy sessions for abused women. In the process, I connected with other survivors who came from all walks of life, finding mutual support and inspiration that persists to this day. In time, my child and I were able to move from San Diego to Boston, where I accepted a position at Harvard Law School. We now enjoy greater peace and safety.

 

Despite that devastating chapter in my life, I consider myself lucky because I got help through it. My goal in publically sharing my story is to shatter stereotypes about who is affected by domestic violence. Often, intelligent and successful women like me fall victim to abuse and are quickly engulfed in shame. That shame is one way an abuser exerts power and control over a woman to keep her trapped in the abusive relationship, and reaching out is a good first step in breaking free. The National Domestic Violence Hotline offers confidential 24/7 help at 1-800-799-7233.

Guest blogger Dovie Yoana King is the founder and director of SOAR for Justice (www.soarforjustice.org), an organization dedicated to helping survivors of abuse rise for justice. 

Tags:  abuse  custody  domestic violence  escape  family violence  guest blogger  hotline  LCB  National Domestic Violence Hotline  police  San Diego Family Justice Center  stereotypes  survivors 

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Life Imitates Law: Are There Things People Won’t Let Happen?

Posted By Bobbi-Jo Dobush, Monday, August 28, 2017
Life Imitates Law: Are There Things People Won’t Let Happen?

After the recent domestic terrorism and displays of white nationalism in Charlottesville and after a robust public discussion about the appropriateness of the resulting political response, I've been re-reading a book I’ve thought about often in recent months. With jarring accuracy, Nathan Hill’s The Nix, (aside from being one of the best books of 2016), covers a huge range of topics, including political response to violence. Although much of the book is set in the late 1960's, there are many ways that The Nix is – to my dismay – relevant in the 21st century.

Hill fictionalizes the 1968 Chicago riots and, at one point, Hill’s character of Walter Cronkite calls the police, “a bunch of thugs” for “beating kids senseless” and “taking off their badges and name tags and lowering their visors . . . to become faceless and unaccountable.” Hill’s Cronkite is made to recant by the forces-that-be because politicians, (including the Chicago mayor), want to justify the violence as a necessary response to a perceived threat. In the book, there are also TV viewers around the country who feel “jazzed up” and “edgy” watching this violence from the safety of their comfortable living rooms, and who feel like protesters “had it coming.”

While obviously not a perfect analogy to recent events, the normalization of hate-fueled violence perpetuated by people whose lives and bodies – and rights to do as they please with those lives and those bodies – are not, and have never been, up for debate or legal scrutiny, feels like a mistake we should have learned from and left in the past.

But I’m leaving something important out: Despite heavy subject matter, The Nix is actually a very funny book that may make you laugh out loud. Hill credits his, “own thinking about how contemporary America is, in some ways, totally absurd,” for the book’s humorous overtone. I, like Hill, am a believer in laughter as coping mechanism, and at times even a solution. But over the last year I’ve been feeling the absurd slip toward the terrifying.

Hearing my mounting dismay, my dad told me last year, “It’s going to be okay – there are things that people won’t let happen.” I didn’t feel immediately comforted because the things I feared were already happening, and continue to happen. However, if people resist the pull of apathy and refuse to bury their moral compasses, if they prioritize equality and access to justice and resources, then – even now – there may still be terrible things that won’t happen because people won’t let them. That is, as long as we remember that each of us is one of those “people” and we must use all available tools (literature, law, humor, empathy) to protect each other, the things we love, and the most vulnerable among us.

Bobbi-Jo Dobush believes that sharing our diverse passions for example the arts, the ocean, or salsa (the condiment) can positively influence our practices. 


Tags:  Art  domestic terrorism  Literature  Nathan Hill  riots  The Nix  violence  white nationalism 

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No advancement in anti-discrimination, as recognized by Professor Hill, and as demonstrated by Google

Posted By Kristen Marquis Fritz, Tuesday, August 15, 2017

No advancement in anti-discrimination, as recognized by Professor Hill, and as demonstrated by Google

 

At the 2017 Lawyers Club Annual Dinner, keynote speaker Anita Hill shared her experiences with both race and gender discrimination with a record audience.  Professor Hill acknowledged that while it is certainly more of a public issue now than it was in the 90s, solutions to the problem of discrimination have advanced little since that time. 

 

The truth of her statement was grandly demonstrated by an internal Google memo that was leaked to the media last week. The ten-page memo, penned by a male Google software engineer, is the epitome of an anti-diversity statement. The memo came to light at the same time as Google is battling a wage discrimination investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor. Thus far, that investigation has uncovered that Google routinely pays women less than men in comparable roles. The author argues that women are underrepresented in tech because of inherent psychological differences of their gender, not because they face bias and discrimination. 

 

The following is the memo author’s statement of his position: “I’m simply stating that the distribution of preferences and abilities of men and women differ in part due to biological causes and that these differences may explain why we don’t see equal representation of women in tech and leadership.” The author then goes on to provide a bulleted list of “personality differences” of women which cause the disparity, which is simply too ridiculous and nonsensical to quote here. 

 

The release of this memo prompted Professor Hill to write an Op-Ed for the New York Times, wherein she discussed the male-dominated leadership of Silicon Valley, and reflected upon how deeply and passionately anti-equality attitudes are held. With words echoing the Lawyers Club mission statement, she said, “It’s time women in tech consider taking advantage of the law to disrupt the industry once and for all.” 

 

What do you think?

 

Kristen Marquis Fritz is an attorney with Smaha Law Group and is also the owner of Professional Fiduciaries of San Diego, Inc.

Tags:  Anita Hill  Google memo  LCB  mission  New York Times 

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The Lost Art of Lingering

Posted By Gina Darvas, Tuesday, August 8, 2017

The Lost Art of Lingering

 

As summer is upon us, hopefully you will take a vacation and have time for lingering. Lingering is a lost art for most of us. To linger, you must have time, company, and nothing more pressing or distracting than paying attention to the person you are with. Lingering after a meal, over a cup of coffee, or over a mug of beer, provides the ideal setting for conversation. Lingering gives time for personal interaction without an agenda. Be it at a park bench, beach, coffee shop, or cafe, lingering is taking the time to simply sit around and notice what is happening around you. Lingering allows for the unexpected, the leisurely; it is to do nothing, but with company.

 

The first enemy of lingering is “the schedule.” Though much can be blamed on an honest lack of time, we have a cultural problem due to over-scheduling. Lawyers especially fall prey to this pitfall. When so many of us are trained to value and bill time in 10 second intervals, it is no surprise we have lost the ability to linger. We watch the clock, always. Wherever we are – in meetings, on the phone, or in court – we keep track of time. 

 

Even when the workday is done, or the weekend is upon us, we simply cannot stop paying attention to the clock. I noticed this recently, when I had dinner with my daughter who had just returned from Europe. We finished eating and were chatting, and I got up to leave. She looked at me and asked, “Are we going?” I said, “Yes, you’re done, aren’t you?” She replied she was finished eating, but, “I thought we were talking.” Yes, we are talking, and here I was being called out by a 20-year old, who had not looked at her watch or phone once the entire evening. My daughter casually replied, “Oh, I guess I got used to lingering . . . .” This made me stop and think.  Where was I going? Why, although I was enjoying her company and our conversation, was I in such a hurry? When had I lost the art of lingering?

 

As lawyers, we are paid to communicate. The time we spend talking to others is always on an agenda and usually with a time sheet to fill out. To learn the art of lingering for those of us who are so time-conditioned will require conscientious efforts to stop looking at the clock. Vacation is the perfect opportunity to practice lingering. If you must, schedule for yourself some unstructured time. Then, move on to the next step: No schedule at all.

 

During the unscheduled time, beware of the mobile electronic device, a.k.a., the mortal enemy of lingering. The mobile device has two features that thwart lingering. The first is the conspicuously displayed clock, drawing our attention back to time. The second, and more insidious, is the personalized and distracting alerts that draw our attention away from our surroundings and human companions—those little red dots telling you someone has noticed and commented on something you posted, or the news alerts, or myriad of other distractions programmers have been paid to create. To appreciate the art of lingering, the mobile device should be put away unseen and unheard, to allow for the unscripted, unstructured to take over.

 

Happy lingering.

 

Gina Darvas is a Deputy District Attorney in the Consumer Protection Unit of the San Diego D.A.'s Office and her practice includes civil and criminal cases. 

Tags:  Lingering  peace  unplugging  unstructured time  work-life balance 

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Chasing the Last Wave: Trashing the Guilt ​

Posted By Molly T. Tami, Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Trashing the Guilt

 

Many women lawyers suffer from guilt over working too much (or not enough), shortchanging their kids and families on quality (and quantity) time, and in general, failing to be the perfect partner, mother, daughter, friend, worker, etc. Most of us have been there at one point in our lives. As we chase the last wave of feminism, isn’t it time we trashed the guilt and lived our lives on our own terms?

 

To further explore this, let’s revisit the topic of networking. In my last blog post, I urged lawyers to pursue yoga (as opposed to golf) for networking and making meaningful connections. How about we embrace other traditional women’s activities as great opportunities for networking, while trashing the guilt we’ve been conditioned to feel over taking time from the workday to enjoy such things? 

 

For example, would you feel justified attending a non-work related “hat luncheon” to support a philanthropic cause?  New York City women lawyers and business executives did just that at the annual Central Park Women’s Committee luncheon. And in doing so, they embraced the idea that “We’re Ladies, We Lunch and We Like It.” As one female lawyer attendee noted, "Men have their golf outings, we have this.” Another attendee noted that men would never apologize about leaving the office to go play golf and they don’t feel uncomfortable blurring lines between pleasure and business. So why should women?  (Be sure to click on the link and read the article to see the fabulous hats worn at the luncheon!)

 

I recently discovered that I too am a lady, who lunches, and likes it! I became a new member of ZLAC Rowing Club here in San Diego, (the oldest women’s rowing club in the country), and I attended the club’s annual Terrace Luncheon. (Disclaimer: the luncheon occurred on a Saturday so I did not have to miss work to attend.) I’m not much of a hat person, but in keeping with the club’s traditions and inspired by the ladies of NYC who attended the Central Park Women’s Committee luncheon, I donned a (borrowed) hat, put on a summery dress and enjoyed a spectacular Saturday afternoon luncheon on the club’s lovely terrace in Pacific Beach.

 

So ladies, let’s continue to chase the last wave and like the women at the NYC luncheon, feel no more guilt for guilty pleasures!

 

Molly Tami, who serves as the Assistant Dean for Career & Professional Development at USD School of Law, is passionate about advancing women in the legal profession.      

Tags:  Chasing the Last Wave  connections  equality  feminism  feminist  gender  golf  hat luncheon  legal profession  networking  women  yoga  ZLAC 

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Student’s Corner: Can We Have It All?

Posted By Student's Corner, Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Can We Have It All?

 

At 6:00 a.m., my alarm goes off and I ignore it. About 15 minutes later, my son goes off with a faint moan from his crib, and I wobble out of bed to prepare breakfast for us downstairs. Breakfast isn’t fancy; he eats Cheerios. I have to prepare just enough for him so that I can put on my makeup undisturbed. This has all been timed through a series of trials and errors. Before, he would run into the bathroom with Legos, or I would find myself going back and forth between tasks, losing precious minutes that could be saved elsewhere. That’s the amazing thing about law school: minutes matter.

 

I have school in the mornings, and my internship in the afternoon. By the time I make it through the week, I’m mentally preparing for the week ahead. In the midst of all this, I encounter women in Lawyers Club who have more than one child, more than two commitments, and countless reasons why they remain humble. They tell me they love what they do. They tell me it’s difficult to find the time for soccer practice, but they do. These are highly-influential, volunteer enthralled, successful attorneys who make my 6:00 a.m. shuffle look like a walk in the park. They don’t just inspire me, they instill a fire in me to want more than what society says I should ask for.

 

In light of the Lawyers Club drawing special attention to issues such as women in the workforce being paid considerably less than men, I found the issue to be so much more important than I’d ever imagined. I look around at my female classmates, and wonder if they’ve considered that the weight of motherhood and the pursuit of their passions are things that may conflict someday. Pondering this, and reading PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi’s 2014 article positing that women can’t have it all, got me thinking . . .

 

Can We Have it All                                        

(poem by Ashanti Cole)

 

Can we have it all 

 

If that means letting things fall?

 

To the wayside. . . some days might expose our flaws.

 

Days to nights . . . to daylight

 

Can we have it all?

 

The love

 

The life

 

The house

 

The rights

 

The child

 

The smile . . .

 

With a passion and a dream that screams so loud without drowning all of the above out?

 

 

Can we have it all?

 

 

We must.

 

We strive for the lives that died.

 

We scream for the tears she cried before 1965 . . . before a time our votes were denied.

 

We must fight for the dream we see when darkness succumbs closed minds.

 

Show them light.

 

Show them that despite their circumstance through color, class, or creed.

 

We deserve to be seen. To show little girls they can be more than pageant queens. Through injustice or through a beaming glory that shines through prosecution, defense, contractual agreements, and more . . . .

 

We must be better than we have ever been before.

 

We will not be ignored.

 

We will have all that's worth striving for.

 

 

Ashanti Cole is a rising 2L and mother of one. Born and raised in Compton, Ca, she enjoys advancing the mission of civil rights and humanitarian efforts through spoken work poetry, and one day through the legal profession. 

Tags:  have it all  Nooyi  poem  Students Corner 

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Guest Blog: The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Posted By Sandra Morris, Tuesday, May 30, 2017
Guest Blog: The more things change, the more they stay the same. 

 

I belong to a family law listserv that includes others besides members of the family law legal community. The other day, a professional preparing a vocational evaluation inquired as to whether any of the attorneys on the listserv would hire as a paralegal a woman who had a 30 year-old paralegal certificate and had not worked as a paralegal since 4 months after receiving it. This resulting question and answer brought me up short:

 

A male attorney answered, “If she’s Scarlett Johannsen [sic], yes. Or Jennifer Lawrence.”

 

A female attorney responded, “So . . . if she was good looking eye candy, her actual skills wouldn’t matter? What is this, 1950?”

 

1950 indeed. Insuring we were not in a time warp, the female responding attorney was told that the male attorney was just joking.

 

I privately thanked the woman for speaking out, but as I thought about this exchange, it seemed to me that we were in a teachable moment. We used to call it consciousness raising. I thought about black face make-up. I thought about Polish jokes. I thought about “there was a car crash with a Rabbi, a Priest, and a Minister…” I thought about blonde jokes. I thought about how many times the subject of the joke was told to suck it up, laugh it off, or be considered humorless by the joke teller and audience. I thought about all the times an audience sucked it up and laughed it off, even when they didn’t like it, rather than appear humorless or non-collegial. And so, I wrote:

 

“I have read the emails with some interest. It is easiest to say nothing, but I believe that it is more important to speak up regarding the issue that has been created, than to remain silent and lose the opportunity for some consciousness raising. 

 

Persons who are not white, male or protestant, or heterosexual, have long been subjected to jokes that are painful to them, but as to which they are told they should pass if off, have some humor, or not make a big deal of it. Not speaking out to say that the comment or joke was hurtful, creates the impression that there was nothing offensive in the remarks, or that whoever did speak out was overly sensitive. Silence is the price paid to not be subjected to further repercussions. 

 

Women have fought really hard to have a seat at the table as equals with men; to have pay as equals for the same work; to progress up the corporate or law firm ladders equally with men. They are not there yet. They need jobs just as much as men. Sometimes, given the number of households headed by a single woman, they need them more than men. When employed, they are often subjected to inappropriate comments and behavior, and risk losing their advancement or even their jobs by reporting it. It is not funny to suggest that all they need to be hired is a pretty face or body.

 

To quote the Supreme Court of Minnesota, which in 1984 quoted Plutarch in censuring a judge in Minnesota for comments made towards a woman prosecutor that were claimed by the judge to be made in good humor, “‘Tho’ boys thro’ stones at frogs in sport, the frogs do not die in sport, but in earnest.’”

 

I received thanks from a number of people, and a couple of angry responses from male attorneys. One disputed there was a glass ceiling and accused me of grinding men under my feet based on a false narrative.  

 

The more things change . . .

 

Sandra, a "Founding Mother" of Lawyers Club, has been in practice since 1970, is a past president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, and is of counsel at Seltzer Caplan McMahon Vitek.

Tags:  founding mother  guest blogger  jokes  joking  listserv  Minnesota  Plutarch  sexism  vocational evaluation 

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My So-Called First World Problems: 5 Must-Reads for Feminist Bookworms

Posted By Rebecca Zipp, Tuesday, May 23, 2017

5 Must-Reads for Feminist Bookworms

 

The Feminine Mystique – Betty Friedan

 

If you read one book on this list, choose this one. The book criticizes society for confining women to their sexual biological roles as wives and mothers, and explores “the problem that has no name:” The widespread misery of women in the 1950s and 1960s, despite material comfort, marriage and children. Friedan argues that women need to find and nurture their identity beyond that of a wife, mother, and homemaker.

 

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up – Marie Kondo

 

Believe me, I debated whether to put this book on the list at all, but this book was one of the two most impactful I read in 2015, so here it is. (The other was Ghettoside by Jill Leovy, and if you have any interest in policing or social justice, close the blog and order Ghettoside right now.) Distilled, Ms. Kondo’s message is simple: Get rid of all your crap. I did. Fewer clothes, dishes, cosmetics and books litter our space, and the reward is a calmer home. It’s a quick read – just commit to her method, and Marie Kondo will truly offer you life-changing magic!   

 

Men Explain Things to Me -- Rebecca Solnit

 

This book is for any woman who has ever had her expertise on a subject dismissed because she is a woman.

Mansplain: To explain something to someone, characteristically by a man to a woman, in a matter regarded as condescending or patronizing. Example: Man explains that women did not write in the Middle Ages, to Kathryn Maude, a woman with a PhD on medieval women’s writing.

This book of essays explores the centuries-long history of men silencing women into submission, of men questioning the veracity of women. A memorable exchange details a man at a dinner party laughingly telling the story of his neighbor running out of her home, naked, screaming that her husband was going to kill her. While the man recounting the story clearly views the naked woman as crazy, he is incapable of imagining that her affluent husband might have been homicidal. Solnit astutely points out that what was a funny anecdote to the story-teller illustrates the potentially fatal consequences of disbelieving women.

 

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn – Betty Smith

 

Grab some peppermints, crawl out to the fire escape, and dive into this classic coming-of-age tale. The heroine, Francie Nolan, overcomes the uglier realities of life in Williamsburg through her love of books and writing. The attentive reader will love, admire, and empathize with Francie and her family. Available at any decent bookstore or library.

 

Saturday Night at the Pahala Theater -- Lois-Ann Yamanaka

 

An obscure book of colorful poetry, Saturday Night at the Pahala Theater explores the deprivations and adversities of an Asian-American girl growing up in a poor family in Hawaii. Prosaic enough to guarantee an enjoyable reading experience for the poetry skeptic, Saturday Night explores a rarely contemplated slice of Americana.

 

Rebecca Zipp is currently reading The Woman in Cabin Ten, and aspires to read the following: The Power and the Powerless; Russia and the Russians; and, When Affirmative Action was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth-Century America, all of which have been sitting on her night table for a minimum of six months. 

Tags:  books  Feminist  Friedan  Kondo  LCB  literature 

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Life Imitates Law: Feisty Boys, Hysterical Dudes

Posted By Bobbi-Jo Dobush, Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Feisty Boys, Hysterical Dudes

 

A few weeks ago, I wrote about how the words used to describe migrants – words that evoke a sense of fear, of disaster – stay with us as we learn about issues of migration and color our perception thereof. The post sparked some conversation and questions about the words typically used to describe women, including professional women, and how language choice affects each of our lives (including our careers). I’ve been doing some digging on this and I want to share these resources, which range from scholarly to smile-inducing:

 

Adult Female Humans = Women.

  • To paraphrase actress Mayim Bialik’s video, one can normally recognize a girl by the fact that she is under 18 and may live with her parents. Being CEO of a company or a mother is a decent indicator that the person in question is, in fact, a woman, not a girl. In line with my previous post, Bialik gets that “language sets expectations.” This is a fun watch. 
  • Gina M. Florio’s 2016 Bustle Article posits that calling women “girls” is infantilizing, creepy, and perpetuates an obsession with female youth. On top of that, we rarely call men “boys” and calling women “girls” prevent us from treating each other as equals. 

Feisty Boys, Hysterical Dudes. 

Gendered Language Bias in the Workplace.

  • In a study analyzing the language of hundreds of performance reviews from professional and technology services companies women were 2.5 times as likely to be called out for aggressive communication styles as men and twice as likely praised for their teamwork or collaboration than men.
  • This problem is not confined to the law: a 2016 Nature Geoscience article found that women are about half as likely as their male counterparts to be described as excellent in recommendation letters, whether the letters are written by women or men. 

Additional Resources:

Please comment and let your fellow Lawyers Club members and me know what you think: Are we perpetuating sexism by refusing to recognize it in its daily forms? Have you ever called anyone groomzilla? (I have, for the record.)   

 

Bobbi-Jo Dobush believes that sharing our diverse passions—for example the arts, the ocean, or salsa (the condiment)—can positively influence our practices. 

Tags:  art  awareness  bias  discrimination  equality  girl  language  LCB 

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