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Lawyers of San Diego is a specialty bar association committed to advancing the status of women in the law and society. We use this space to share articles written about Lawyers Club events and programs and items of interest to our members which are relevant to our mission. The opinions outlined in content published on the Lawyers Club of San Diego blog are those of the authors and not of Lawyers Club. All members are encouraged to participate respectfully in discussions regarding the topics posted on the blog. Guest writers are welcome.

 

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Guest Blog: Living Your Authentic Self in Business

Posted By Marci Bair, Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Living Your Authentic Self in Business

 

We have just kicked off the LGBTQ Task Force of Lawyers Club of San Diego. Our primary purpose is to work to identify, acknowledge, and address the unique challenges faced by LGBTQ women in the legal community. In our introductory meeting, we shared standard networking meeting information—our names, businesses, and areas of specialty. What was unique to this meeting was an additional question, “Why are you interested in joining the Lawyers Club LGBTQ Task Force?” Answers ranged from straight allies who had an LGBTQ family member they wanted to support, to members that identified as LGBTQ, to others that were just supportive of the LGBTQ community and wanted to lend their help. Some attorneys shared stories of being LGBTQ but not “out” at work at all, or not being out with clients. They shared their concern that being “out” may hurt their business or work promotion opportunities.

 

After leaving the meeting, I got to thinking about how much more productive and happy a person can be when they are able to bring their whole self to work and live an authentic life.

 

I have tried to live my life authentically inside and outside of the business world, and have always been open and transparent with my clients that I am gay. I don’t waive a rainbow flag as soon as they enter my office, but I proudly display pictures of my wife and kids around my office. I also state on the front page of my website that I work with LGBTQ couples and have an image of an LGBTQ family. Some people in business feel that if their clients find out they are LGBTQ, they may lose business or feel that it is none of the clients’ business. Both of these are very valid points and if you are a private person, you may be more comfortable not talking about your family whether you are LGBTQ or straight.

 

However, living more openly in the business world has allowed me to carve out a niche and a devoted clientele that is also either LGBTQ or progressive. This allows me to build stronger bonds and more trust than I might have otherwise. I am pleased to say that I am celebrating 25 years with my business and the majority of my clients are LGBTQ or referred from the LGBTQ community—showing that you can have a thriving business and be openly LGBTQ.

 

In San Diego, we are lucky to have so many LGBTQ-oriented professional organizations, such as the Tom Homann Law Association, Diversity Supplier Alliance, and Greater San Diego Business Association, in addition to open and inclusive organizations like Lawyers Club where LGBTQ or progressive business owners are welcomed and can thrive.

 

If you want to attract and retain LGBTQ clients, there are simple things you can do, like state on your website that you work with LGBTQ families, or use images of LGBTQ couples to let a prospective client know that your office is a safe place for them to come and feel comfortable. In addition, you can make sure that your intake forms or fact finders are LGBTQ-friendly by not just stating a place for husband and wife, but instead using the term spouse/partner. Also, when a client is single or does not come in with their spouse or partner, don’t assume that they are straight.

We all work with clients at sensitive points in their lives. The more we can make them feel comfortable, the better the relationship will be with them and the more enjoyable the experience.

 

The more you are able to live your authentic life in business, the happier you will be and the more business you will attract because you will be working with your whole self.

 

Marci Bair wrote this for the Lawyers Club LGBTQ Task Force, and as the President of Bair Financial Planning, she has provided financial planning and impact investing for sustainable wealth for the past 25 years.

Tags:  authentic life  business  LCB  LGBTQ  LGBTQ Task Force  out  same-sex couples  straight  Tom Homan 

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I Am Not Your "Sweetheart"

Posted By Whitney Hodges, Wednesday, October 18, 2017

I Am Not Your “Sweetheart”

 

Sometimes sexist behavior that occurs in the courtroom is as slight as a male counterpart refusing to look at a female attorney when she speaks, or as overt as a male judge or lawyer calling a female colleague “honey,” “sweetheart,” or “dear.” I distinctly remember the day the latter happened to me while arguing a motion. Prior to appearing before the judge, opposing counsel asked me if I was my partner’s secretary. I brushed that off as an intimidation tactic, but was absolutely gob smacked when the same counsel called me “sweetheart” in open court. I expectantly looked at the judge, thinking he would, in some way, reprimand opposing counsel. To my dismay, the judge just rolled his eyes and proceeded with the matter as if nothing had happened.  

 

The consequences for attorneys who undertake this despicable behavior have changed, thanks to recent revisions to the American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct (ABA Model Rules) which have been adopted by over a dozen states. These changes make sexist comments and behaviors professional misconduct. Specifically, in 2016, the ABA approved revisions to Model Rule 8.4 providing that a lawyer may not engage in conduct that the lawyer knows, or ought to know, amounts to harassment or discrimination on the basis of race, sex, religion, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or socioeconomic status.

 

Linda Bray Chanow, Executive Director for the Center for Women in Law at the University of Texas, and driving force behind the revision, noted that while the entrance rate for women in law has increased over the years, there “continues to be widespread disrespect and harassment for women lawyers.” Susan B. Goldberg, director for Gender and Sexuality at Columbia Law School, noted that such disrespect and harassment can hurt a lawyers’ case. “When a lawyer is addressed in a fashion in open court – these kinds of remarks can affect the way a jury or others in the courtroom perceive the lawyer,” Goldberg said.

 

In response to ABA Model Rule 8.4, the State Bar of California’s Second Commission for the Revision of the Rules of Professional Conduct has proposed to add Rule 8.4.1 to California’s Rules, based upon existing Rule 2-400. Proposed Rule 8.4.1 expands Rule 2-400’s focus on discrimination in the context of employment and representation decisions to encompass harassment and discrimination against any person in the course of a representation. Proposed Rule 8.4.1 also recognizes a much wider range of “protected characteristics” than are recognized by Rule 2-400.

 

Unfortunately, California’s proposed Rule 8.4.1 has not received a resounding endorsement from the State Bar’s Board of Trustees. Board member Sean M. SeLegue expressed concern about, “. . . resource-allocation and institutional competence issues as well as a concern that enactment of the rule would create disappointment and disillusionment with complainants when the State Bar decides it is not the appropriate forum for a particular complaint of discrimination.”

 

The fate of proposed Rule 8.4.1 is now in the hands of the California Supreme Court. Until a decision is made, a female litigator’s primary recourse against inappropriate and sexist behavior in the courtroom may only be a terse, “I am not your sweetheart.”

 

 

Whitney Hodges wrote this for the Lawyers Club Bench Bar Committee, and works as a senior associate in the Land Use and Environmental group based in the San Diego office of Sheppard, Mullin, Richter and Hampton LLP.

Tags:  ABA Model Rules  California Rules of Professional Conduct  gender discrimination  LCB  Rule 2-400  sweetheart 

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Student’s Corner: Reflection on the Las Vegas Tragedy

Posted By Student's Corner, Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Student’s Corner: Reflection on the Las Vegas Tragedy

 

In the midst of the tragedy that claimed the lives of 59 souls in Las Vegas on Sunday, October 1, 2017, I wanted to reflect this week on exactly what it means to be alive in this world. We get so wrapped up in our careers, our commitments, and our goals that we lose sight of the most precious gift we are given without trying: life.

 

We wake up each day, hold our friends and family close, and are encouraged to persevere through some of the toughest challenges life throws at us. We lost a member of the legal community and Lawyers Club in this tragic event, Jennifer Irvine. I had the pleasure of witnessing Jennifer speak at a California Western event last year, and I remember her encouraging students such as myself to persevere through the semester. She had taken the time to reach back to her community, and for that I am grateful.

 

I hope that we all are able to come together in this tragic circumstance and find a togetherness as women and as human beings, determined to live our lives with a purpose and a gratefulness like never before.  

 

Ashanti Cole is a 2L and a mother of one who enjoys advancing the mission of civil rights and humanitarian efforts through spoken-word poetry and one day through the legal profession. 

Tags:  Jennifer Irvine  Las Vegas  LCB  life  purpose  student's corner  tragedy 

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167 Years, No Women

Posted By Yahairah Aristy, Thursday, October 5, 2017
167 Years, No Women

 

Growing up in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, a kaleidoscope of race, ethnicities and culture was the norm. Being a “woman of color” was not even a phrase in my vocabulary until I became a lawyer. Being a woman of color and an attorney at the same time is no easy feat!


In 2012, Ms. Jackie Lacey was the first woman and the first African American elected to be District Attorney for Los Angeles, one of the largest criminal justice systems in California. She was re-elected in 2016 without any opposition. To many, (including me), this formidable achievement is to be applauded; however, it also raises an eyebrow.


The L.A. District Attorney’s office was created in 1850. It took 167 years for a woman and an African American to be elected, in spite of the presence of women and African Americans in all aspects of the criminal justice system and communities. A revelatory illustration that, “Sometimes the wheels of justice grind slowly.”


In two weeks, I look forward to hearing Ms. Lacey’s advice on how women of color can overcome challenges to advance in the legal profession. As a member of the Diverse Women’s Committee and a woman of color in the legal profession I am well aware that these challenges exist, but also can be overcome.


Join us for this important luncheon on October 19, 2017 –
register now!

 

 

Deputy Public Defender Yahairah Aristy wrote this post for the Diverse Women’s Committee, was born and raised in New York City, and believes diversity and inclusion are a recipe for societal success.

Tags:  diversity  justice  LCB  Los Angeles  Los Angeles District Attorney  luncheon  women of color 

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Passing the Torch

Posted By Holly Hanover, Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Passing the Torch

Edith (Edie) Windsor and LGBTQ activism were born in the 1920s. Both remained closeted for decades, but in the 1960s, a seismic event in New York City inspired Ms. Windsor and countless others to say “Enough.” 

Edie Windsor was born shortly before the stock market crash of 1929 and five years after the first U.S. Gay Rights Association. Edie met Thea Spyer at a dance in Greenwich Village in 1963. They danced the night away, and danced often in the years after. By 1967, when marriage – and even a relationship between two women – was illegal in the United States, Thea got down on one knee and proposed to Edie. Rather than risking exposure with an engagement ring, Thea gave Edie a circular diamond pin.

In 1969, the couple returned from a holiday on June 28th to their usually boisterous neighborhood. Edie went out for groceries and saw the aftermath of the Stonewall Riots. “There were a lot of cops . . . a very strange kind of feeling,” she observed. The night before, police had raided the Stonewall Inn to harass the gay men inside. Police often conducted raids there, citing the patrons for “offensive” behaviors and beating them during arrests. This time, the gay people fought back.

Before that day, Edie lied to others constantly to hide who she was. She feared being associated with the gay community. That event altered her. “From that day on, I had this incredible gratitude . . . . They changed my life forever.”  

Afterwards, Edie and Thea lived openly as lesbians, and together as an engaged couple for over 40 years. Edie cared for Thea after she contracted multiple sclerosis, leaving her a quadriplegic. They married in 2007 in Canada, because marriage had recently been legalized there. In 2009, Thea died in their home, with Edie by her side.

---

“Marriage is a magic word. And it is magic throughout the world.

It has to do with our dignity as human beings, to be who we are openly.”

- Edith Windsor

---

When processing Thea’s estate, Edie learned the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) prevented her from being recognized as a legal spouse. She had to pay $363,053 in taxes, which a heterosexual wife would never have been required to pay. Facing this fundamental injustice, Edie chose to fight back and stand up for herself.

After a 4-year court battle, the Supreme Court ruled in her favor. In 2013, her case, U.S. v. Windsor, became one of three seminal rulings that changed the lives of LGBTQ people in the United States:

  1. Lawrence v. Texas (2003) – Texas law criminalizing "homosexual conduct" is unconstitutional.
  2.  U.S. v. Windsor (2013) – DOMA section 3 is unconstitutional; federal government cannot discriminate against married LGBTQ couples when determining federal benefits/protections.
  3.  Obergefell v. Hodges (2015) – Same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional. Expanded the Windsor decision, creating protection for same-sex marriage under Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment, and forcing recognition of marriages performed out-of-state.

---

 “Sometimes there are days like this when that slow, steady effort is

rewarded with justice that arrives like a thunderbolt.”

- Barack Obama

---

The recent progress of the LGBTQ community has suffered numerous setbacks since January. Responsibility now falls to a new generation to continue the persistent fight to allow everyone in the U.S. the same rights and opportunities. On September 12, 2017, Edie Windsor passed away in Manhattan. It is time to pick up her torch and carry it forward. 

 

Holly Hanover wrote this for the Lawyers Club LGBTQ Task Force and runs a Federal Criminal Defense practice at The Law Offices of Holly S. Hanover, representing indigent clients for more than 22 years.

Tags:  activism  Edith Windsor  LCB  LGBTQ  LGBTQ Task Force  same sex marriage  Supreme Court 

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Guest Blog: Fear of Flying or Just Say Yes?

Posted By Jodie M. Williams, Tuesday, September 12, 2017
Guest Blog: Fear of Flying or Just Say Yes?

In spring 2017, I hosted a podcast for the ABA Section of Antitrust Law entitled, “Women in Antitrust.” I interviewed three outstanding women in the field: Lisa Phelan, Antitrust Division Chief for the Washington Criminal I Section of the Department of Justice; Tianna Russell, a trial attorney working with Ms. Phelan at the Department of Justice; and Kristen Anderson, a partner at Scott + Scott in New York (her firm also has an office in San Diego). 


Antitrust is economics-driven and particularly male-dominated, more so than many other areas of law. In the podcast, my guests discussed a range of topics relevant to women, from how to position yourself better in the workplace, to weathering the administration change (or any change in management, for that matter). While focused on antitrust practice, their words of wisdom transcend the antitrust niche and apply to any area of the law. I thought it was prime for posting here, and fortunately Lawyers Club agreed. (In that vein, I thought that a title with an homage to two famous women – one a
great feminist author and the other an iconic first lady – was appropriate.)


One thing that Ms. Phelan said struck me in particular: Don’t be afraid to say yes. She explained that women often don’t say yes because we’re too afraid of failing. As a result, we count ourselves out from the get-go. As I listened to her, I found myself reflecting on several times in my own practice where I did not step up, take on more work within my cases, or participate in extra-curricular programs for fear that I might not have enough time. What if it took away from my kids? What if I took on too much? What if I failed? I was so concerned I would not succeed, that I took myself out of the running before I even got started. So, when Ms. Phelan later asked me to put together a proposal for a Women in Antitrust subcommittee for the ABA Section of Antitrust Law, I took a healthy dose of her advice. I said yes. 


Time will tell if our proposal is accepted, but I will be ready if and (hopefully) when it is. I hope the words of these women similarly inspire you. Please,
take a listen

Guest blogger Jodie M. Williams is Counsel at MoginRubin LLP, a boutique antitrust firm in San Diego and Washington, D.C.

Tags:  ABA antitrust section  antitrust  LCB  podcast  yes 

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Guest Blog - Surviving Domestic Violence: My Personal Journey

Posted By Dovie Yoana King, Wednesday, September 6, 2017
Guest Blog - Surviving Domestic Violence: My Personal Journey

 

Domestic violence is a serious, preventable, public health epidemic that affects millions of Americans each year. It can happen to anyone regardless of age, education, economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion, or national origin. Domestic violence is usually accompanied by emotionally abusive and controlling behavior that is part of a systematic pattern of dominance and control.

 

Survivors of abuse tend to suffer alone in silence, leading lives of isolation, shame, fear and secrecy. It takes incredible determination for survivors to step forward and seek help. I speak from personal experience, as I too was once a victim of domestic violence.

 

In my case, I married over a decade ago with every illusion of living a happy life. I was a young attorney at the peak of my career and thriving in my personal and professional life. I had a bright future ahead of me; however, the illusion of happiness quickly shattered. I endured domestic violence in the form of emotional, verbal, sexual, physical, and financial abuse for years. 

 

Unfortunately, like many other professional women, I did not think it could happen to me. After all, I am educated, bright, and talented. I have high self-esteem and am successful in my career as a lawyer, fighting for social justice on behalf of my clients. Thus, I did not feel I fit the stereotype of an abused woman. But behind closed doors, I was hiding a dark secret – I was being constantly berated, belittled, humiliated, and devalued by my abuser, and all of this was compounded by other forms of abuse.

 

But all was not lost. I decided to break the silence and get help to escape the abuse. I contacted a hotline for help and was put in touch with my local police department. From there, I was referred to the San Diego Family Justice Center, which is an organization that provides free and comprehensive services to victims of abuse and their children. I filed for divorce and successfully obtained both a domestic violence restraining order and the sole, legal, and physical custody of my young child. I began attending weekly support groups and therapy sessions for abused women. In the process, I connected with other survivors who came from all walks of life, finding mutual support and inspiration that persists to this day. In time, my child and I were able to move from San Diego to Boston, where I accepted a position at Harvard Law School. We now enjoy greater peace and safety.

 

Despite that devastating chapter in my life, I consider myself lucky because I got help through it. My goal in publically sharing my story is to shatter stereotypes about who is affected by domestic violence. Often, intelligent and successful women like me fall victim to abuse and are quickly engulfed in shame. That shame is one way an abuser exerts power and control over a woman to keep her trapped in the abusive relationship, and reaching out is a good first step in breaking free. The National Domestic Violence Hotline offers confidential 24/7 help at 1-800-799-7233.

Guest blogger Dovie Yoana King is the founder and director of SOAR for Justice (www.soarforjustice.org), an organization dedicated to helping survivors of abuse rise for justice. 

Tags:  abuse  custody  domestic violence  escape  family violence  guest blogger  hotline  LCB  National Domestic Violence Hotline  police  San Diego Family Justice Center  stereotypes  survivors 

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Life Imitates Law: Are There Things People Won’t Let Happen?

Posted By Bobbi-Jo Dobush, Monday, August 28, 2017
Life Imitates Law: Are There Things People Won’t Let Happen?

After the recent domestic terrorism and displays of white nationalism in Charlottesville and after a robust public discussion about the appropriateness of the resulting political response, I've been re-reading a book I’ve thought about often in recent months. With jarring accuracy, Nathan Hill’s The Nix, (aside from being one of the best books of 2016), covers a huge range of topics, including political response to violence. Although much of the book is set in the late 1960's, there are many ways that The Nix is – to my dismay – relevant in the 21st century.

Hill fictionalizes the 1968 Chicago riots and, at one point, Hill’s character of Walter Cronkite calls the police, “a bunch of thugs” for “beating kids senseless” and “taking off their badges and name tags and lowering their visors . . . to become faceless and unaccountable.” Hill’s Cronkite is made to recant by the forces-that-be because politicians, (including the Chicago mayor), want to justify the violence as a necessary response to a perceived threat. In the book, there are also TV viewers around the country who feel “jazzed up” and “edgy” watching this violence from the safety of their comfortable living rooms, and who feel like protesters “had it coming.”

While obviously not a perfect analogy to recent events, the normalization of hate-fueled violence perpetuated by people whose lives and bodies – and rights to do as they please with those lives and those bodies – are not, and have never been, up for debate or legal scrutiny, feels like a mistake we should have learned from and left in the past.

But I’m leaving something important out: Despite heavy subject matter, The Nix is actually a very funny book that may make you laugh out loud. Hill credits his, “own thinking about how contemporary America is, in some ways, totally absurd,” for the book’s humorous overtone. I, like Hill, am a believer in laughter as coping mechanism, and at times even a solution. But over the last year I’ve been feeling the absurd slip toward the terrifying.

Hearing my mounting dismay, my dad told me last year, “It’s going to be okay – there are things that people won’t let happen.” I didn’t feel immediately comforted because the things I feared were already happening, and continue to happen. However, if people resist the pull of apathy and refuse to bury their moral compasses, if they prioritize equality and access to justice and resources, then – even now – there may still be terrible things that won’t happen because people won’t let them. That is, as long as we remember that each of us is one of those “people” and we must use all available tools (literature, law, humor, empathy) to protect each other, the things we love, and the most vulnerable among us.

Bobbi-Jo Dobush believes that sharing our diverse passions for example the arts, the ocean, or salsa (the condiment) can positively influence our practices. 


Tags:  Art  domestic terrorism  Literature  Nathan Hill  riots  The Nix  violence  white nationalism 

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No advancement in anti-discrimination, as recognized by Professor Hill, and as demonstrated by Google

Posted By Kristen Marquis Fritz, Tuesday, August 15, 2017

No advancement in anti-discrimination, as recognized by Professor Hill, and as demonstrated by Google

 

At the 2017 Lawyers Club Annual Dinner, keynote speaker Anita Hill shared her experiences with both race and gender discrimination with a record audience.  Professor Hill acknowledged that while it is certainly more of a public issue now than it was in the 90s, solutions to the problem of discrimination have advanced little since that time. 

 

The truth of her statement was grandly demonstrated by an internal Google memo that was leaked to the media last week. The ten-page memo, penned by a male Google software engineer, is the epitome of an anti-diversity statement. The memo came to light at the same time as Google is battling a wage discrimination investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor. Thus far, that investigation has uncovered that Google routinely pays women less than men in comparable roles. The author argues that women are underrepresented in tech because of inherent psychological differences of their gender, not because they face bias and discrimination. 

 

The following is the memo author’s statement of his position: “I’m simply stating that the distribution of preferences and abilities of men and women differ in part due to biological causes and that these differences may explain why we don’t see equal representation of women in tech and leadership.” The author then goes on to provide a bulleted list of “personality differences” of women which cause the disparity, which is simply too ridiculous and nonsensical to quote here. 

 

The release of this memo prompted Professor Hill to write an Op-Ed for the New York Times, wherein she discussed the male-dominated leadership of Silicon Valley, and reflected upon how deeply and passionately anti-equality attitudes are held. With words echoing the Lawyers Club mission statement, she said, “It’s time women in tech consider taking advantage of the law to disrupt the industry once and for all.” 

 

What do you think?

 

Kristen Marquis Fritz is an attorney with Smaha Law Group and is also the owner of Professional Fiduciaries of San Diego, Inc.

Tags:  Anita Hill  Google memo  LCB  mission  New York Times 

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The Lost Art of Lingering

Posted By Gina Darvas, Tuesday, August 8, 2017

The Lost Art of Lingering

 

As summer is upon us, hopefully you will take a vacation and have time for lingering. Lingering is a lost art for most of us. To linger, you must have time, company, and nothing more pressing or distracting than paying attention to the person you are with. Lingering after a meal, over a cup of coffee, or over a mug of beer, provides the ideal setting for conversation. Lingering gives time for personal interaction without an agenda. Be it at a park bench, beach, coffee shop, or cafe, lingering is taking the time to simply sit around and notice what is happening around you. Lingering allows for the unexpected, the leisurely; it is to do nothing, but with company.

 

The first enemy of lingering is “the schedule.” Though much can be blamed on an honest lack of time, we have a cultural problem due to over-scheduling. Lawyers especially fall prey to this pitfall. When so many of us are trained to value and bill time in 10 second intervals, it is no surprise we have lost the ability to linger. We watch the clock, always. Wherever we are – in meetings, on the phone, or in court – we keep track of time. 

 

Even when the workday is done, or the weekend is upon us, we simply cannot stop paying attention to the clock. I noticed this recently, when I had dinner with my daughter who had just returned from Europe. We finished eating and were chatting, and I got up to leave. She looked at me and asked, “Are we going?” I said, “Yes, you’re done, aren’t you?” She replied she was finished eating, but, “I thought we were talking.” Yes, we are talking, and here I was being called out by a 20-year old, who had not looked at her watch or phone once the entire evening. My daughter casually replied, “Oh, I guess I got used to lingering . . . .” This made me stop and think.  Where was I going? Why, although I was enjoying her company and our conversation, was I in such a hurry? When had I lost the art of lingering?

 

As lawyers, we are paid to communicate. The time we spend talking to others is always on an agenda and usually with a time sheet to fill out. To learn the art of lingering for those of us who are so time-conditioned will require conscientious efforts to stop looking at the clock. Vacation is the perfect opportunity to practice lingering. If you must, schedule for yourself some unstructured time. Then, move on to the next step: No schedule at all.

 

During the unscheduled time, beware of the mobile electronic device, a.k.a., the mortal enemy of lingering. The mobile device has two features that thwart lingering. The first is the conspicuously displayed clock, drawing our attention back to time. The second, and more insidious, is the personalized and distracting alerts that draw our attention away from our surroundings and human companions—those little red dots telling you someone has noticed and commented on something you posted, or the news alerts, or myriad of other distractions programmers have been paid to create. To appreciate the art of lingering, the mobile device should be put away unseen and unheard, to allow for the unscripted, unstructured to take over.

 

Happy lingering.

 

Gina Darvas is a Deputy District Attorney in the Consumer Protection Unit of the San Diego D.A.'s Office and her practice includes civil and criminal cases. 

Tags:  Lingering  peace  unplugging  unstructured time  work-life balance 

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