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Lawyers Club of San Diego is a specialty bar association committed to advancing the status of women in the law and society. We use this space to share articles written about Lawyers Club events and programs and items of interest to our members which are relevant to our mission. The opinions outlined in content published on the Lawyers Club of San Diego blog are those of the authors and not of Lawyers Club. All members are encouraged to participate respectfully in discussions regarding the topics posted on the blog. Guest writers are welcome. Guidelines for writers may be found on the Leadership Resources page.

 

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The Myth of Pay Parity

Posted By Yahairah Aristy: A President’s Perspective, Friday, August 14, 2020
Updated: Thursday, August 13, 2020

Today is Black’s Women Equal Pay Day. It is not a day for celebration. Instead, a day of concern. A Black woman must work 20 months to earn the same $1.00 that men earned in 2019. Native American women will have to work 21 months for the same dollar and Latina women 23 months. Asian women earn the same dollar in 14 months.


If we narrow the focus to the pay gap in the legal industry by gender, women lawyers in an uncontrolled salary environment earn $0.64 and in a controlled salary environment earn $1.00. (The State of the Gender Gap in 2020). “Uncontrolled –or ‘raw’ gender pay gap, looks at the median salary for all men and women regardless of job type or worker seniority” versus a controlled salary environment which is when all “compensable factors such as experience, industry and job level are accounted…”. (Ibid.)


The reality that in a controlled salary environment, women in the legal field can have pay parity with their male counterparts, offers hope. Therefore, law firms must choose to review their compensation practices to ensure women and men receive equal pay for equal work, and ensure opportunities for advancement for women.


This is easily done if law firms ensure transparency exists in every step of the compensation process. (Ibid.) “Pay transparency is about organizations sharing information about their pay practices, decision-making and using a data-driven approach that emphasizes the work versus a person’s demographics. (Ibid.)


Lawyers Club is proud to advocate for this transparency to ensure pay parity for all.

 

Yahairah Aristy is a Deputy Public Defender, and is the 2020-2021 president of Lawyers Club of San Diego.

 


Tags:  Black women  Black Women Equal Pay Day  equal pay  gender pay gap  legal field  legal profession  pay parity  salary 

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Advocating for Women of Color

Posted By Elvira Cortez: A President's Perspective, Thursday, January 30, 2020
Updated: Thursday, January 30, 2020

 

As many of you know, women of color face many obstacles in the legal profession. Studies have shown that the combination, or intersectionality, of race and gender has a particularly devastating effect on the professional lives of women of color. For example, Black women only earn 65% of wages earned by men and Latinas 62%. Women of color are also much more likely to leave the private practice or the legal profession entirely. While the Judicial Council of California does not identify demographics for judges based on a combination of gender and race, its annual judicial survey has shown that Asians comprise of 7.8%, Blacks comprise of 7.5%, and Latinos comprise 10.8% of superior court judges.

In order for women of color to succeed in the legal profession they need advocates that will address the barriers to success. The San Diego community is fortunate to have the Hon. Vallera Johnson, who has been an advocate of women of color for decades. Judge Johnson is this year’s keynote speaker for the Women of Color Reception, which is scheduled for February 13, 2020 at Procopio. We hope you will join us and be inspired by sage advice and good company

 

Elvira Cortez practices business and commercial litigation and employment defense at Dinsmore & Shohl, LLP and is the 2019-2020 president of Lawyers Club.

 

Tags:  advocacy  gender  gender pay gap  intersectionality  race  representation  women of color 

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Make The Ask

Posted By Elvira Cortez: A President's Perspective, Friday, December 6, 2019
Updated: Thursday, December 5, 2019
As you begin to make plans for the holidays, you should also plan to make your pitch for a raise or promotion. December is the month that many San Diego law firms and organizations make determinations regarding promotions and raises. This is the time to make the ask.

So, how do you make the ask? Be prepared to highlight your accomplishments for the year and your value to the firm. Understand the compensation of similar attorneys in your position or the accomplishments sought for the promotion you seek. Be your best advocate by practicing your pitch.

While it is intimidating to make the ask, it is necessary to chip away at the gender pay gap and increase the number of women in leadership positions in the law. For example, while women are 45 percent of associates, they are only 22.7 percent of partners and 19 percent of equity partners. We can make our best effort to redress these inequalities by stepping up and making the ask.

 

 

Elvira Cortez practices business and commercial litigation and employment defense at Dinsmore & Shohl, LLP and is the 2019-2020 president of Lawyers Club.

 

Tags:  ask  equality  equity  gender equality  gender pay gap  pitch  promotion  raise  women in leadership 

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Off the Beaten Partner Track: "It’s Time to Stop Blaming Women for the Gender Pay Gap"

Posted By Jillian Fairchild , Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, November 22, 2016

It’s Time to Stop Blaming Women for the Gender Pay Gap


It is time to stop blaming women for the pay gap. Women have shouldered the bulk of the criticism for the wage gap for years. The results of a new study show that the differences in pay between men and women is actually due to discrimination.

 

In conjunction with the discussion regarding the wage gap between men and women, there have been many reasons given for the differences in pay. In addition to the discussion regarding the biases contributing to the problem, many of these explanations seem to either blame the women themselves or criticize what was deemed to be their natural characteristics.

 

Some of the reasons frequently given for wage inequality include women’s failure to negotiate pay and taking time off to raise children. There have also been some that argue the reason women are paid less is because women tend to choose lower paying jobs. Men, it is thought, choose better paying jobs like science, tech, engineering, and math.  Meanwhile, women become teachers or work for non-profits.

 

One of the other reasons frequently asserted for wage inequality is that women don’t ask for raises. Simply put, women do not get what they deserve because they don’t ask for it. Women are less likely to negotiate for themselves because they are socialized from a young age not to promote their own interests. Also women tend to assume they will be recognized and rewarded for working hard and doing a good job. Unlike men, this theory goes, they haven’t been taught they can ask for more.

 

A recent study debunks this commonly held idea that women are less aggressive negotiators when it comes to pay. A new study shows that women do ask for pay raises just as often as men, but the problem is they are less likely to get them. This study showed that women were 25% less likely than men to get a hike in pay when they asked for it. The researchers noted that they expected the study to show that women were “less pushy” than men, but their findings showed there is discrimination against women.

 

The results of this study show what most women already know - discrimination is a reason for the gender wage gap. Women sense there is discrimination keeping the pay gap in place, but there are entrenched ideas that it is their fault. They are taught that if only they asked for more raises, did not choose family over work, and chose the right careers then they would make more money. However, this study shows that even if women did everything right, there would still be inequality due to discrimination.

 

From now on when we hear someone blaming a woman for getting paid less than a man, then we should speak up. We need to point out there is inherent sexism keeping women from closing the gap that no amount of negotiating can close. We need to stand up for each other until this discrimination no longer exists.

 

This blog was authored by Jillian Fairchild. Jillian is a full-time litigator and full-time mom who spends her spare time trying to keep the princess culture away from her daughter (and failing miserably!).

 

Tags:  Gender Pay Gap  LCB  Off the Beaten Partner Track  wage discrimination  women negotiating salary 

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more Calendar

9/30/2020
Fall Virtual Mixer: For Members New and Not-so New: Where Everyone Takes a Seat at the Bar!

10/15/2020
Diverse Women's Committee Program: Women at the Forefront of Social Change

10/26/2020
HTC MCLE Labor Trafficking 101

11/19/2020
Equal Pay Day Event

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